Tag: section 44

The dual citizen ban – what was Barton thinking?

BY BRUCE DYER

Dual citizen parliamentarians are banned under Australia’s Constitution – even if they don’t know of their foreign citizenship. The far-reaching implications of this are evident from Re Canavan and Re Gallagher.

The dual citizen ban results … Read the rest

Bye-bye By-Elections? Ritual and Rhythm and Voting out of Season

BY GRAEME ORR

By-elections have been a fixture of our political landscape since colonial times, and then some. They emerged, at Westminster, in the 16th century Reformation Parliament. By the 17th century Restoration they were common. Not least … Read the rest

Re Gallagher: Inconsistency, Imperatives and Irremediable Impediments

Anne Photos 003BY ANNE TWOMEY

The High Court’s judgment in Re Gallagher caused four Members of Parliament to resign and provoked further debate about the amendment of s 44 of the Constitution.  This culminated in a report by the Joint Standing Committee … Read the rest

The High Court on Constitutional Law: The 2017 Term Keynote Address to 2018 Constitutional Law Conference

BY JUSTIN GLEESON SC

 

This post is a keynote paper that was delivered by Justin Gleeson SC at the 2018 Constitutional Law Conference in Sydney. Noting that other papers at the conference covered individual cases from 2017, Mr Gleeson Read the rest

“Exclusive Cognisance” and Cognitive Dissonance: Alley v Gillespie

BY TONY BLACKSHIELD

Section 44 of the Constitution – which provides that various categories of persons are incapable of being chosen to sit in the federal Parliament – has been the subject of extraordinary controversy since 2017. In this post, Read the rest

Re Nash [No 2]: The Essence of Time

BY ARTHUR MARUSEVICH

On 15 November 2017, when the High Court sitting as the Court of Disputed Returns handed down its decision in Re Nash [No 2] [2017] HCA 52, it became clear that the 2016 general election was … Read the rest

Seven Little Australians

BY TONY BLACKSHIELD

Senator Nick Xenophon is OK. Although it employs the word “Citizen”, his status as a “British Overseas Citizen” confers such limited rights and privileges that it does not amount to “citizenship”.

Senator Matt Canavan is OK because … Read the rest

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