Category: Executive Power (page 1 of 3)

The “Car Park Rorts” Affair and Grants Regulation in Australia: How can We Fix the System?

BY YEE-FUI NG

Yet another rorts scandal is swirling around the federal government, dubbed the ‘car park rorts’ affair. The Auditor-General has reported that a $389 million car park construction fund has been administered ineffectively and that the Minister had … Read the rest

The Administrative Decisions (Judicial Review) Act 1977 and what it says about judicial review and administrative law

This is the fourth in a special series of posts on the 50th anniversary of the Kerr Report, examining whether Australian administrative law is still fit for purpose. To see other posts in this series, click here.

BY THOMAS Read the rest

MZAPC: Calibrating constitutional limits on legislative power

BY EMILY HAMMOND

The High Court’s decision in MZAPC v Minister for Immigration & Border Protection [2021] HCA 17 reveals continuing differences in judicial approach to a central concept for Australian judicial review – jurisdictional error. In this post, I … Read the rest

The Kerr Report’s vision for the Administrative Review Council and the (sad) modern reality

This is the third in a special series of posts on the 50th anniversary of the Kerr Report, examining whether Australian administrative law is still fit for purpose. To see other posts in this series, click here.

BY NARELLE Read the rest

Seeing the New Administrative Law in a ‘green light’

This is the second in a special series of posts on the 50th anniversary of the Kerr Report, examining whether Australian administrative law is still fit for purpose. To see other posts in this series, click here.

BY LYNSEY Read the rest

How should a court respond to an immaterial error of law?

BY LISA BURTON CRAWFORD

In the recent case of ABT17 v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, the High Court unanimously held that a decision of the Immigration Assessment Authority (‘IAA’) to refuse a protection visa to the applicant … Read the rest

The National Cabinet: Presidentialised Politics, Power-sharing and a Deficit in Transparency

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

“You CAN handle the … trial of defence members for any offence,” High Court tells Military Tribunals

BY STEPHEN MCDONALD

Introduction

The Commonwealth Constitution embodies a separation of judicial power from executive and legislative power. While the boundaries between each species of power are not sharply defined, it has long been accepted that “convictions for offences Read the rest

Queensland Public Health Laws and COVID-19: A Challenge to the Rule of Law?

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

Delegated Legislation and Democracy: The Problem of Exemptions

BY LORNE NEUDORF

Introduction

Delegated legislation has become the principal form of lawmaking in Australia’s legal system. By volume, it makes up the majority of new federal law that is made each year. It is everywhere, touching upon nearly all … Read the rest

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