Category: Executive Power (page 1 of 2)

How should a court respond to an immaterial error of law?

BY LISA BURTON CRAWFORD

In the recent case of ABT17 v Minister for Immigration and Border Protection, the High Court unanimously held that a decision of the Immigration Assessment Authority (‘IAA’) to refuse a protection visa to the applicant … Read the rest

The National Cabinet: Presidentialised Politics, Power-sharing and a Deficit in Transparency

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

“You CAN handle the … trial of defence members for any offence,” High Court tells Military Tribunals

BY STEPHEN MCDONALD

Introduction

The Commonwealth Constitution embodies a separation of judicial power from executive and legislative power. While the boundaries between each species of power are not sharply defined, it has long been accepted that “convictions for offences Read the rest

Queensland Public Health Laws and COVID-19: A Challenge to the Rule of Law?

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

Delegated Legislation and Democracy: The Problem of Exemptions

BY LORNE NEUDORF

Introduction

Delegated legislation has become the principal form of lawmaking in Australia’s legal system. By volume, it makes up the majority of new federal law that is made each year. It is everywhere, touching upon nearly all … Read the rest

Accountability, discretion and the rule of law: Issues in pandemic policing

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

The Brett Cattle Case: Exploring the limits of delegated law-making powers

BY JANINA BOUGHEY

Justice Rares’s judgment in Brett Cattle Company Pty Ltd v Minister for Agriculture [2020] FCA 732 (“Brett Cattle”) has attracted a lot of attention for being a “landmark” ruling on the tort of misfeasance in … Read the rest

Government Under Law: Smethurst v Commissioner of Police

BY JEFF GORDON

Is it consistent with the rule of law that a grave overstep of government power is merely paid for when it can be easily reversed? In Smethurst v Commissioner of Police [2020] HCA 14, the High Court … Read the rest

Tasmania’s Subordinate Legislation Committee fails to provide democratic accountability during the COVID-19 emergency

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

An Executive Grab for Power During COVID-19?

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

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