Category: Democracy (page 1 of 10)

Chetcuti and constitutional membership: context, case and implications

BY ELISA ARCIONI AND RAYNER THWAITES

Introduction

The Chetcuti decision of 12 August 2021 is the High Court’s latest attempt to delineate a concept of constitutional membership. Here membership is understood as ‘non-alienage’; in practical terms, immunity to deportation. The … Read the rest

Witnesses J, K – and L? Open Justice, the NSI Act and the Constitution

BY KIERAN PENDER

In the preface to a collection of criminal cases published in 1730, barrister and writer Sollom Emlyn sung the praises of the British legal system. ‘In other countries the Courts of Justice are held in secret; with … Read the rest

The Commonwealth Ombudsman: still fit for purpose?

This is the seventh in a special series of posts on the 50th anniversary of the Kerr Report, examining whether Australian administrative law is still fit for purpose. To see other posts in this series, click here.

BY ANITA Read the rest

Foreign influence and the implied freedom of political communication: LibertyWorks v Commonwealth

BY JOSH GIBSON

Introduction

On 16 June 2021, the High Court delivered its judgment in LibertyWorks Inc v Commonwealth of Australia [2021] HCA 18 (LibertyWorks v Commonwealth). The case centred on the Foreign Influence Transparency Scheme Act Read the rest

The Rise of Automated Decision-Making in the Administrative State: Are Kerr’s Institutions still ‘Fit for Purpose’?

This is the sixth in a special series of posts on the 50th anniversary of the Kerr Report, examining whether Australian administrative law is still fit for purpose. To see other posts in this series, click here.

BY YEE-FUI NGRead the rest

The “Car Park Rorts” Affair and Grants Regulation in Australia: How can We Fix the System?

BY YEE-FUI NG

Yet another rorts scandal is swirling around the federal government, dubbed the ‘car park rorts’ affair. The Auditor-General has reported that a $389 million car park construction fund has been administered ineffectively and that the Minister had … Read the rest

How culture shapes Australia’s referendum record

This post and the accompanying post by Gabrielle Appleby continue a 2021 special series, which is a companion to the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law’s Global Public Law Virtual Book Series. The aim of the virtual book Read the rest

The First Nations Voice: A modest and congruent, yet radically transformative constitutional proposal

This post and the accompanying post by Paul Kildea continue a 2021 special series, which is a companion to the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law’s Global Public Law Virtual Book Series. The aim of the virtual book Read the rest

Legislative morass and the rule of law: a warning, and some possible solutions

BY WILLIAM ISDALE AND CHRISTOPHER ASH

Introduction

Today, legislation is the predominant source of law. Its voluminous production is a central feature of our governance, and shows no signs of slowing. “[E]very day”, Waldron writes, “another demand emerges for … Read the rest

A critical review of City, State and potential implications for Australian cities

This post is the first in a 2021 special series, which is a companion to the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law’s Global Public Law Virtual Book Series. The aim of the virtual book series is to invite Read the rest

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