Category: Constitutional Law (page 1 of 6)

Appeals to Australia from Nauru: The High Court’s Unusual Jurisdiction

BY ANDREW ROBERTS

The High Court has recently handed down three decisions in its unusual jurisdiction hearing appeals from the Supreme Court of Nauru. BRF038 v Republic of Nauru (delivered 18 October 2017) and HFM045 v Republic of Nauru (delivered … Read the rest

Wilkie v Commonwealth: A Retreat to Combet over the Bones of Pape, Williams, and Responsible Government

BY ANNE TWOMEY

Such was the interest in the High Court’s judgment in Wilkie v Commonwealth and Australian Marriage Equality Ltd v Minister for Finance [2017] HCA 40 (hereafter ‘Wilkie’) that it caused the High Court’s web-site to … Read the rest

High Court Special Leave Decisions: Constitutional Problems with the Lack of Reasons

BY LUKE BECK

 

The High Court almost never gives proper reasons for its decisions on applications for special leave to appeal. In a new article in the University of New South Wales Law Journal, I argue that this … Read the rest

Justice Edelman’s originalism, or hints of it

BY JULIAN R MURPHY

 

Justice Edelman has only been on the High Court for a matter of months but he has already sat on a number of significant constitutional cases, and there are more on the horizon. The newest … Read the rest

The trajectory of structured proportionality in implied freedom of political communication cases: Brown v Tasmania

  BY SHIPRA CHORDIA

On 18 October, the High Court handed down its judgment in Brown v Tasmania [2017] HCA 43.  The plaintiffs – Dr Bob Brown and Ms Jessica Hoyt – successfully argued that certain provisions of the Workplaces Read the rest

The Right to Protest after Brown v Tasmania

BY JOHN ELDRIDGE AND TIM MATTHEWS

The common law has historically been hostile to the importance of public protest. Indeed, A V Dicey, in his seminal An Introduction to the Study of the Law of the Constitution, was categorical … Read the rest

Seven Little Australians

BY TONY BLACKSHIELD

Senator Nick Xenophon is OK. Although it employs the word “Citizen”, his status as a “British Overseas Citizen” confers such limited rights and privileges that it does not amount to “citizenship”.

Senator Matt Canavan is OK because … Read the rest

Aliens, Executive Power, and the Rule of Law

BY SUE MILNE

The Rule of Law requires that all, including the legislative, executive and judicial branches of government, are subject to the law. But what is the relevant law to which all are subject? In Plaintiff S195/2016 v Minister Read the rest

Mistake to consolidate Premier and Attorney-General portfolios

BY BRENDAN GOGARTY

Last week’s Cabinet reshuffle in Tasmania might have passed by mainland Australians. It was one made in clearly ‘challenging circumstances‘ for the Government; with one Cabinet Minister quitting politics for family reasons and the other … Read the rest

Section 44, Interpretation and Changing the Law

BY DAVID TAN

In the Engineer’s case, Higgins J stated:

‘The question [of constitutional interpretation] is, what does the language mean; and when we find what the language means, in its ordinary and natural sense, it is our duty to

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