Category: Comparative public law (page 1 of 3)

Seeing the New Administrative Law in a ‘green light’

This is the second in a special series of posts on the 50th anniversary of the Kerr Report, examining whether Australian administrative law is still fit for purpose. To see other posts in this series, click here.

BY LYNSEY Read the rest

50 years after the Kerr Report: Is Australian administrative law still fit for purpose?

This is the first in a special series of posts on the 50th anniversary of the Kerr Report, examining whether Australian administrative law is still fit for purpose. To see other posts in this series, click here.

BY JANINA Read the rest

Protest in a Pandemic – The Special Status of Public Spaces

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.Read the rest

Freedom of Expression and the Ban on Arabic in NSW Prisons – Analysing Hamzy v Commissioner of Corrective Services [2020] NSWSC 414

BY ALEXANDRA GREY

The NSW Supreme Court’s judgment in Hamzy v Commissioner of Corrective Services, handed down in April, upholds the legality of NSW’s English-only rules on communication by “extreme high risk restricted” (EHRR) inmates. It provides a rare … Read the rest

Courts and COVID-19: Challenges and Opportunities in Australia

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here

BY … Read the rest

The Demos in a Pandemic – Staging Elections during a Health Emergency

This is one of a special series of posts exploring the public law implications of the COVID-19 pandemic. For more information on the Gilbert + Tobin Centre’s work in the area of public law and public health, see here.

BY … Read the rest

Climate change and human rights under the Australian Charters

BY KENT BLORE

Late last year, the Dutch case of Urgenda made international headlines when the Dutch Supreme Court found its government in breach of the rights to life and privacy for failing to scale up its emissions reductions targets … Read the rest

Can Parliamentary Privilege be Used to Shut Down Parliamentary Accountability?

BY ANNE TWOMEY

Parliamentary privilege was established for the purposes of protecting Members of Parliament from being prosecuted or penalised for what they debated in Parliament or from being controlled by the executive in what they were permitted to debate. … Read the rest

Climate change and human rights to collide before the United Nations Human Rights Committee

BY EBONY BACK AND REBECCA LUCAS

Introduction

There has been a spate of legal actions (both domestic and international) around the world in the past few years attempting to hold governments accountable for their inaction on climate change and the … Read the rest

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