Welcome to the August edition of the AUSPUBLAW Australian Public Law Events Roundup.

Remember, if you have an AUSPUBLAW opportunity, conference or significant public lecture that you would like included in this roundup, please contact us at auspublaw@unsw.edu.au.

An integrity system still in the making? Lessons so far for South Australia from the ‘Whistling While They Work 2’ project

Australian Institute of Administrative Law

Date: 1 August 2017

Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Location: Pilgrim Centre Hall, Adelaide

This seminar will be given by A J Brown, Professor of Public Policy and Law and program leader, Public Integrity & Anti-Corruption in the Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University, and chaired by Emily Strickland, Deputy Ombudsman, South Australia.   ‘Whistling While They Work 2’ s the first large-scale (multi-institutional) empirical study of organisational responsiveness to whistleblowing, supported by 23 partner organisations in Australia and New Zealand including the SA Ombudsman and SA ICAC.

For more information, see the website.

Sir Anthony Mason Honorary Lecture: Executive and Legislative Power in the Implementation of Intergovernmental Agreements

Melbourne Law School

Date: 4 August 2017

Time: 6:30-7:30pm

Location: Melbourne Law School

The Honourable Robert French, former Chief Justice of Australia, will deliver the 2017 Sir Anthony Mason Honorary Lecture, in which he will consider the question of the effect of intergovernmental agreements on Commonwealth legislative and executive powers and the position of the states in the Federation.

For more information, see the website.

ALRC inquiry into the incarceration rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Australian National University, Centre of International & Public Law

Date: 7 August 2017

Time: 3:00-4:00pm

Location: Australian National University, College of Law

Judge Matthew Myers AM will speak about his work as ALRC Commissioner on the inquiry into the incarceration rates of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander People.

For more information, see the website.

The Rise of Populism and the Future of Human Rights

Melbourne Law School

Date: 7 August 2017

Time: 6:00-7:00pm

Location: Melbourne Law School

This public lecture will be delivered by Professor Philip Alston is the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights, John Norton Pomeroy Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and co-Chair of the School’s Centre for Human Rights and Global Justice. It will suggest what can be done in the face of the rise to power of populist leaders in key countries around the world which has led to the closing down of space for civil society and increasing pressure on UN institutions.

For more information, see the website.

Monash Law Book Launch

Faculty of Law, Monash University

Date: 8 August 2017

Time: 6:30-8:30pm

Location: The Essoign, Melbourne

The Honourable Robert French will launch two recent publications, The Rule of Law and the Australian Constitution, by Dr Lisa Burton Crawford and Human Rights and Judicial Review in Australia and Canada: The Newest Despotism, by Dr Janina Boughey.

For more information, see the website.

’67 Referendum Panel Discussion

Queensland University of Technology

Date: 9 August 2017

Time: 3:15-5:30pm

Location: Queensland University of Technology

An expert panel will discuss the legal, social and cultural ramifications of the historic 1967 Referendum. The panel will be chaired by Dr Sandra Phillips, QUT, and will include Sam Watson, Dr Chelsea Bond, QUT, Peter Black, QUT and Joshua Creamer of Griffith Chambers, Brisbane.

Registration is essential. For more information, see the website.

Out of Syria, Searching for Safety: Creative approaches to refugee protection

Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law,  UNSW

Dates: 9 August 2017

Location: Allens Linklaters, Sydney

Time: 5:30-7:00pm

More than 6 million people are displaced within Syria and more than 5 million have fled to other countries, mostly to the Middle East. In this panel discussion, three experts will provide their insights into what is working and what is needed – in host countries in the Middle East, Europe and Australia. The panel will include UNHCR Lebanon representative, Mireille Girard, Dr Clair Higgins, Kaldor Centre, and Omar Al Kassab, Syrian refugee, activist and humanitarian campaigner. It will be chaired by Professor Guy Goodwin-Gill, Acting Director of the Kaldor Centre.

For more information, see the website.

The Australian Human Rights Centre Annual Lecture 2017 with Professor Philip Alston

Australian Human Rights Centre and UNSW’s Grand Challenge on Inequality

Date: 10 August 2017

Time: 6:30-8:00pm

Location: UNSW, Kensington

Professor Philip Alston is the UN Special Rapporteur on extreme poverty and human rights. He is John Norton Pomeroy Professor of Law at New York University School of Law and co-Chair of the School’s Centre for Human Rights and Global Justice. His lecture will address the threat that growing inequality around the world presents to democracy and human rights and asks what can the human rights movement, which has so far had little to say on these matters, offer in response.

For more information, see the website.

12th Fiat Justitia Lecture: Judge Bridlegoose, Randomness and Rationality in Administrative Decision-making

Faculty of Law, Monash University

Date: 15 August 2017

Time: 6:00-7:00pm

Location: Monash University Law Chambers, Melbourne

The lecture will be presented by the Honourable Robert French AC, Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia from 2008-2017, Distinguished Professional in Residence, Faculty of Law, Monash University and convened by Emeritus Professor HP Lee and Professor Marilyn Pittard, Faculty of Law, Monash University.

For more information, see the website.

Breaking the Deadlock – Creating Solutions for Refugees

Kaldor Centre and UNSW’s Grand Challenge on Refugees and Migrants

Date: 15 August 2017

Time: 6:30-8:00pm

Location: Sydney Opera House

Broadcaster Linda Mottram will lead a conversation with Paris Aristotle AO, Professor Gillian Triggs, Professor Guy S. Goodwin-Gill and Huy Truong about what a just, lawful and humane approach to refugees in Australia could look like. Can the deadlock on refugee and asylum seeker policies in Australia be broken? This will be an evening of positive discussion about fresh approaches to the bind Australia is in on these issues.

For more information, see the website.

Accountability & the Law Conference 2017

The Australia Institute

Date: 17 August 2017

Location: Canberra

Weak accountability laws, low levels of public disclosure and the lack of a federal anti-corruption watchdog make many cases of undue influence and soft corruption at a federal level hidden from public view. With experts from across legal and academic fields, the Conference will discuss the weaknesses in the current federal accountability system and suggest mechanisms for reform. Speakers include Nicholas Cowdery AM QC, Shadow Attorney General Mark Dreyfus QC, Senator Nick Xenophon, George Williams AO, Bret Walker SC, Noel Hutley SC, Professor AJ Brown, Associate Professor Joo Cheong Tham and Associate Professor Gabrielle Appleby.

For more information, see the website.

Public Lecture: Justice Mary Gaudron by the Hon Justice Roslyn Atkinson AO

Selden Society

Date: 24 August 2017

Time: 5:15pm

Location: Banco Court, Brisbane

Mary Genevieve Gaudron was the first woman to be appointed a justice of the High Court of Australia. Gaudron served on the Court as one of its most influential members for 16 years (1987-2003). Gaudron’s career has been described as ‘a classic example of talent and industry triumphant over limited opportunity’. This lecture will be delivered by the Hon Justice Roslyn Atkinson AO.

For more information, see the website.

2017 Hal Wootten Lecture

UNSW Law School

Date: 24 August 2017

Time: 6:30pm-9:30pm

Location: UNSW Law, Kensington

UNSW Law alumna, Elizabeth Broderick AO, will deliver the 2017 Hal Wootten Lecture. Throughout her career Elizabeth has brought together captains of industry, governments and defence force chiefs to address gender inequality in Australia and beyond.

For more information, see the website.

Julius Stone Institute Seminar: What does it mean to “offend”, “insult”, “humiliate” and “intimidate”? Section 18C of the Racial Discrimination Act (Cth) and the problem of harm

Julius Stone Institute, Sydney Law School

Date: 24 August 2017

Location: Sydney Law School

There has been significant public debate about the wording of section 18C of the Commonwealth Racial Discrimination Act (RDA), specifically in relation to the words “offend” and “insult.” The inclusion of these words in the offence, it is argued, is not only too broad and too vague, but also unduly restricts freedom of speech. Part of the problem is that the legislation does not define the key terms – offend, insult, humiliate and intimidate, or establish a harm threshold – and so leaves itself open to the charge that it is too imprecise to have any meaningful legal content.

In this paper, Sarah Sorial takes up this definitional challenge with reference to Joel Feinberg’s discussion of harm and its relation to hurt and offence. She argues that while the terms offend, insult, humiliate and intimidate may be conceptually different, and may not necessarily cause harm in and of themselves, they are in fact closely interrelated. Words that offend, insult, intimidate or humiliate, when uttered in particular contexts, can and do cause harm. Harm is defined in terms of setbacks or damage to a person’s interests and can be understood in both an objective and subjective way. Dr Sorial argues that because there are compelling reasons for restricting speech that causes harm more generally, and because speech that offends, insults, humiliates and intimidates, can also cause harm (as she will demonstrate), there is nothing unduly restrictive about s18C in its current form.

For more information, see the website.

Conference: 1917: Intervention, Revolution and International Law(s)

Melbourne Law School

Dates: 24-25 August 2017

Location: Melbourne Law School

The Laureate Program in International Law will host a conference at Melbourne Law School from 24–25 August. Entitled ‘1917: Revolution, Intervention and International Law(s)’, the conference will be convened by Ms Kathryn Greenman, Professor Anne Orford, Ms Anna Saunders, and Dr Ntina Tzouvala. It marks the 100-year anniversary of the October Revolution and the passage of the revolutionary Mexican constitution.

This conference will draw together a range of scholars and disciplines to explore the place of revolution in the international legal order. How did or does international law conceptualise or juridify revolution? What different mechanisms did international law employ in response to the various challenges posed by revolution to particular interests, regimes or paradigms (of property, peace, or politics)? What different forms of intervention (through the laws of war, of expropriation, or of restitution) did they prompt? In the wake of a revolutionary event, should we speak of international law, or rather of rival international laws? Is international law’s structure a means of countering or containing revolution?

The call for papers is now closed. For more information, see the website.

Reflections on the Miller Case

TC Beirne School of Law

Dates: 1 September 2017

Times: 3:00pm-4:00pm

Location: TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland

Nicholas Barber, Associate Professor of Constitutional Law, University of Oxford, will consider the landmark case of R(Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union, and argue that the Miller decision is less radical than it might at first seem.

For more information, see the website.

2017 Dennis Leslie Mahoney Prize Lecture: Re-Imagining the Rule of Law

Julius Stone Institute, Sydney Law School

Dates: 7 September 2017

Times: 6:00pm-7:30pm (registration from 5:30pm)

Location: Sydney Law School

Martin Krygier, Gordon Samuels Professor of Law and Social Theory, UNSW, is the recipient of the 2016 Dennis Leslie Mahoney Prize in Legal Theory. The topic of his lecture is Re-Imagining the Rule of Law.

For more information, see the website.

Conference to mark the 40th Anniversary of the Federal Court of Australia

Australian National University, Centre for Commercial Law and Centre for International and Public Law

Dates: 8-9 September 2017

Location: Sydney

This conference will mark the 40th anniversary of the establishment of the Federal Court.  Current and former Federal Court Justices and leading academics and practitioners will consider the contribution of the Court to the development of Australian law.

Confirmed speakers include The Hon Chief Justice James Allsop AO, The Hon Justice Michelle Gordon, The Hon Justice Mark Weinberg, The Hon Justice Andrew Greenwood, The Hon Justice Alan Robertson, The Hon Justice John Griffiths, The Hon Justice Debra Mortimer, Prof Elise Bant, Prof Mick Dodson AM, Prof William Gummow AC, Prof Mary Keyes, Dr Jeremy Kirk SC, Mr Russell Miller AM, Assoc Prof Jeannie Paterson, Prof Joellen Riley, Prof Peta Spender, Prof James Stellios, Prof Miranda Stewart and Prof Fiona Wheeler.

For more information, see the website.

Julius Stone Address 2017

Julius Stone Institute, Sydney Law School

Dates: 18 September 2017

Times: 6:00pm-7:30pm (registration from 5:30pm)

Location: Sydney Law School

The 2017 Julius Stone Address will be delivered by Seana Valentine Shiffrin, Chair and Professor of Philosophy and Pete Kameron Professor of Law and Social Justice at UCLA. The lecture will offer an account of democracy’s intrinsic communicative value and law’s special role in realising that value.

For more information, see the website.

Organised Crime and Corruption Forum

TC Beirne School of Law

Date: 19-21 September 2017

Location: University of Queensland, Brisbane

This is a four day event comprising public lectures, panel discussions and roundtable workshops exploring a range of issues concerning organised crime and corruption. It will bring together experts from government, international organisations, the judiciary, legal profession, industry and academia to share experience, exchange ideas and develop outcomes for policy development, law reform and further research.

For more information, see the website.

Against epistocracy: Reconsidering the demographic objection

Deliberative Governance and Law Program, Australian National University

Dates: 26 September 2017

Times: 3:00pm-4:00pm

Location: ANU College of Law, Canberra

Udit Bhatia, University of Oxford, will consider the question of why we should prefer democracy to an epistocracy of competent persons by building upon the arguments of David Estlund regarding the ‘demographic objection’.

For more information, see the website.

Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law Annual Conference 2017: ‘The Global Compacts on Refugees and Migrants’

Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law, UNSW

Dates: 24 November 2017

Location: UNSW, Kensington

In 2018, world leaders will adopt two landmark documents – a Global Compact on Refugees, and a Global Compact on Safe, Regular and Orderly Migration. Amidst debate about what these agreements should contain and how ambitious they should be, the 2017 Kaldor Centre Conference takes stock of where we are so far, and anticipates what developments we will see in the lead-up to their adoption in 2018. The Conference will bring together leading international and local experts involved in the process to share their insights and projections. The keynote speaker will be Professor Elizabeth Ferris, a leading expert on forced migration at Georgetown University and the Brookings Institution.

For more information, see the website.

Public Lecture: Inaugural Lord Atkin Lecture by the Hon Chief Justice Susan Kiefel AC

Selden Society

Date: 28 November 2017

Time: 5:15pm

Location: Banco Court, Brisbane

An annual Lord Atkin Lecture has been introduced this year to mark the 150th anniversary of the birth of Lord Atkin – one of the common law’s most influential judges. The objective of the Lord Atkin lecture is to invite leading contemporary lawyers to discuss key turning points in the common law or challenges that the common law is yet to resolve. The inaugural lecture will be presented by the Chief Justice of the High Court of Australia, the Hon Susan Kiefel AC.

For more information, see the website.

Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand Conference 2017

Law and Society Association of Australia and New Zealand

Dates: 6-9 December 2017

Location: Dunedin, New Zealand

The conference will explore the important and inherent component of the law and society discipline: justice. Justice seeks a safe, fair and just society. The Conference sub themes are:

  • Cultural justice:culture includes age, socio-economic status, gender, urban/rural, ethnicity and religion. Thus cultural justice includes fairness in relation to cultural and demographic information, barriers and challenges;
  • Transitional justice: an approach to achieve justice in times of transition from conflict, colonisation and/or state repression, including the rights of victims, rights of Indigenous Peoples, promoting civic trust and strengthening the democratic rule of law; human rights abuses, violence, and truth commissions;
  • Criminal justice:including sentencing, sexual violence, miscarriages of justice, prisons and prisoners;
  • Gender justice: ending inequalities between women and men that are produced and reproduced in the family, the community, the market and state;
  • Justice institutions, practice and practitioners:including alternative dispute resolution, therapeutic justice, problem solving courts, procedural justice, restorative justice, collaborative law, legal education, legal services/assistance, litigants, the judiciary, legal ethics, future of legal institutions, practice and practitioners.
  • Environmental justice:specifically considering the development for legal standing and fair treatment of non-humans including trees, rivers, national parks and animals.

The call for papers closes on 14 July. For more information, see the website.

Save the date: 2017 Final Courts Round-up

Date: 7 December 2017

Location: Sydney

Further details about this annual event will be forthcoming.

IACL World Congress 2018: ‘Violent Conflicts, Peace-Building and Constitutional Law’

Date: 18-22 June 2018

Location: Seoul

This will be the tenth World Congress of the International Association of Constitutional Law (‘IACL’). The theme of the World Congress is ‘Violent Conflicts, Peace-Building and Constitutional Law’. The World Congress will be hosted and co-organised by the Korean Association of the IACL in collaboration with the Executive Committee of the IACL.

For more information, see the website.

Save the date: 2018 ICON-S (International Society of Public Law) Conference

Date: 25-27 June 2018

Location: Hong Kong

Further details about this annual event will be made available on the website.

Third Biennial Public Law Conference

Melbourne Law School

Date: 11-13 July 2018

Location: Melbourne Law School

The Public Law Conference series is the pre-eminent regular forum for the discussion of public law matters in the common law world. Melbourne Law School will host the Third Biennial Public Law Conference, co-organised by the University of Melbourne and the University of Cambridge.

The 2018 conference, co-convened by Mark Elliott (Cambridge) and Jason Varuhas (Melbourne), will feature approximately 70 speakers from across the common law world, and bring together over 300 delegates to discuss the most important issues in public law today. The convenors have confirmed the participation of a number of leading judges and scholars from common law jurisdictions. The full list of confirmed speakers can be found here.

The theme of the conference is “The Frontiers of Public Law”. The theme is intended to invite engagement with a range of questions concerning both boundaries within public law and the boundaries of public law. Among the questions that fall within the theme are ones concerning the relationship between and the respective boundaries of public and private law; the distinction between domestic and international law, and public law’s response to it; the notions of global administrative and constitutional law and their relationship with domestic systems of public law; the boundary between law and politics viewed from a public law perspective; and the scope of application of public law norms. A fuller description of the conference theme can be found here.

The call for papers closes on 25 August 2017. For more information, see the website.

World Congress of Political Science

‘Borders and Margins’

Dates: 21-26 July 2018

Location: Brisbane

The post-Cold War acceleration of globalization and the multi-layered consequences of the 9/11 terrorist attacks have had profound effects on borders. These borders create margins, through which administrative and military bureaucracies, NGOs, activists, and more-or-less organized criminals and terrorists operate, empirically and conceptually. The evolution of information technologies has transformed the traditional “border as a barrier” by enclosing people into groups with common identities and interests, dispersed throughout the globe but virtually connected.

The call for panel and paper proposals will close on 10 October 2017. For more information, see the website.