Welcome to the April edition of the AUSPUBLAW Australian Public Law Events Roundup. We’d like to thank Nakul Bhagwat, the Gilbert + Tobin Centre of Public Law social justice intern, for his assistance in compiling this events roundup.

Remember, if you have an AUSPUBLAW opportunity, conference or significant public lecture that you would like included in this roundup, please contact us at auspublaw@unsw.edu.au.

Seminar: Richard Posner and a Life in the Law

Sydney Law School

Date: 3 April 2017

Time: 6:00-8:00pm

Location: Sydney Law School

Justice Richard Posner is the most important figure in the law in the United States of the last hundred years, if not longer, with unrivalled influence as an academic, public intellectual, and judge. Apart from writing more articles, books, and judicial opinions than anyone else—he has been mostly known, rightly so, for his contributions to pragmatism and economic analysis of law, both on and off the bench. The seminar will be presented by William Domnarski, the author of Justice Posner’s biography.

For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Brexit and the British Constitution

Constitutional Centre of Western Australia

Date: 4 April 2017

Time: 6:00-7:00pm

Location: Constitutional Centre of Western Australia, Perth

This seminar will explore the recent UK ‘Brexit’ referendum in which a majority of votes were cast in favour of leaving the European Union and the ensuing events including the Supreme Court challenge in R (Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union [2017] UKSC 5. The seminar will be presented by Professor Thomas Poole of the London School of Economics and chaired by Professor Mark Beeson of the University of Western Australia.

For more information, see the website.

Symposium: Remote Control of Asylum Seekers: The US Experience

Melbourne Law School

Date: 5 April 2017

Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Location: Melbourne Law School

This talk will be presented by Professor David FitzGerald, the Theodore E. Gildred Chair in US-Mexican Relations and Co-Director of the Centre for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego. Professor FitzGerald will discuss US efforts towards ‘remote control’ of asylum seekers – on sea, land, air, and in countries of origin – and the role of law, norms and politics in limiting them.

For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Local Government and Conflicts of Interest with Michael Roder SC

Australian Institute of Administrative Law

Date: 5 April 2017

Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Location: Pilgrim Centre Hall, Adelaide

Michael Roder SC is the Head of Chambers at Howard Zelling Chambers. He practices extensively in public and administrative law. He will examine the new conflict of interest provisions, provide insight as to whether the current regime offers an improvement to the previous provisions, and detail where the provisions are deficient, in an effort to assist elected members, employees and external oversight bodies to untangle the new red tape.

For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Elections, Primordialism and Intolerance in Indonesia

Melbourne Law School

Date: 5 April 2017

Time: 5:30-7:00pm

Location: Melbourne Law School

This seminar will be presented by Dr Sandra Hamid, the Asia Foundation’s Country Representative to Indonesia. In this seminar, Dr Hamid will ask what has allowed religious intolerance to take centre stage in Indonesia’s electoral democracy.

For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Retail Analytics, Big Data Logics and Fair Collection under Australian Privacy Law

TC Beirne School of Law

Date: 6 April 2017

Time: 12:30pm

Location: University of Queensland, Brisbane

Retailers are increasingly using analytics to stay competitive. However, it is unclear whether retail analytics collections of customer data are compatible with the ‘fair collection’ principles (APPs 1, 3, 5) of the Privacy Act 1988 (Cth).  This thesis, presented by PhD Candidate Helen Gregorczuk, will look at the compatibility of these ‘fair collection’ principles with retail analytics collections with a view to making recommendations around what a fair collection should look like under the Privacy Act in an increasingly big data environment.

This event is open to all and no RSVP is required. For more information, see the website.

Public lecture: US Influence on the Australian Legal System by the Hon. Robert French AC

University of Western Australia and Perth USAsia Centre

Date: 10 April 2017

Time: 5:15-6:45pm

Location: University of Western Australia, Perth

The Hon. Robert French AC, former chief justice of the High Court, will address the significant influence the political and legal architecture of the United States has had on the Australian legal system. Introducing Justice French will be Perth USAsia Centre Director and former Foreign Affairs and Defence Minister, Professor Stephen Smith.

For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Is State Sovereignty an Empty Concept? Two Lessons from Alf Ross

Sydney Law School

Date: 11 April 2017

Time: 6:00-8:00pm

Location: Sydney Law School

The seminar will be presented by Dr Andrea Dolcetti, a lecturer in constitutional law and jurisprudence at the University of Oxford. His paper argues that state sovereignty should not be thought of as an empty concept, and critically revisits Alf Ross’ analysis of legal concepts.

For more information, see the website.

Symposium: Remote Control of Asylum Seekers: The US Experience

Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law

Date: 11 April 2017

Time: 6:30-7:30pm

Location: Allens Linklaters, Sydney

This talk will be presented by Professor David FitzGerald, the Theodore E. Gildred Chair in US-Mexican Relations and Co-Director of the Centre for Comparative Immigration Studies at the University of California, San Diego. Professor FitzGerald will discuss US efforts towards ‘remote control’ of asylum seekers – on sea, land, air, and in countries of origin – and the role of law, norms and politics in limiting them.

For more information, see the website.

Public lecture: Government Contracts and Public Law

Melbourne Law School

Date: 11 April 2017

Time: 7:00-8:30pm

Location: Melbourne Law School

The Hon. Kenneth Hayne AC, former justice of the High Court, will deliver a speech on government contracts and public law, focusing on the Commonwealth executive’s non-statutory power to enter contracts.

This event is open to all and no RSVP is necessary. For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Judicial Review of Adjudication Determinations Under the Construction Contracts Act

Australian Institute of Administrative Law

Date: 20 April 2017

Time: 1:00-2:00pm

Location: Squire Patton Boggs, Perth

The seminar will be presented by Mr Kanaga Dharmananda SC, Ms Sarah Russell and Mr Tom Porter. The seminar can be counted towards CPD requirements.

For more information, see the website.

Seminar: The Brexit Case: Three Competing Syllogisms

University of Queensland, Australian Association of Constitutional Law, Supreme Court Library Queensland

Date: 20 April 2017

Time: 5:30-7:30pm

Location: Supreme Court of Queensland, Brisbane

This seminar is part of the  Current Constitutional Controversies Occasional Colloquium Series.  The speaker will be Professor Nicholas Aroney, TC Beirne School of Law, University of Queensland, and the commentator will be Mr Peter Dunning QC S-G, Solicitor-General for Queensland.  The seminar will be chaired by the Honourable Justice Patrick Keane AC, High Court of Australia.  It will explore the profound questions about the international prerogatives of the Crown and the interpretation of parliamentary legislation regulating the UK’s membership of the EU raised by the UK Supreme Court’s landmark decision in R(Miller) v Secretary of State for Exiting the European Union.  For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Legitimate Crowdsourced Constitution-Making

Sydney Law School

Date: 4 May 2017

Time: 6:00-8:00pm

Location: Sydney Law School

The seminar will be presented by Dr Carlos Bernal, an associate professor at Macquarie Law School. His paper critically analyses essential features of crowdsourced constitution-making, its potential for enhancing democratic participation and legitimacy, and its challenges and risks.

For more information, see the website.

Seminar: Structured Proportionality after McCloy and Murphy

Australian Association of Constitutional Law

Date: 17 May 2017

Time: 5.30pm – 7.00pm

Location:  Federal Court of Australia, Sydney

This event is for members of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law (AACL).  If you are interested in becoming a member of AACL see this website.

In this seminar, Shipra Chordia, UNSW, will give a paper on structured proportionality in Australia following the High Court decisions in McCloy and Murphy. The seminar will be chaired by Sir Anthony Mason AC KBE CBE QC and will feature Nicholas Owens SC, Fifth Floor St James Hall and Associate Professor Gabrielle Appleby as commentators.

Biennial Interdisciplinary Conference of the Transnational, International and Comparative Law and Policy Network

‘The Law and Politics of Control and Power’

Transnational, International and Comparative Law and Policy Network

Dates: 26–27 May 2017

Location: Bond University, Gold Coast

The Conference will bring together an interdisciplinary network of academics, policy-makers and professionals engaged in legal, international relations and public policy research examining Australia in a globalised world. The Conference will feature a keynote address by Professor Kim Rubenstein and ten sessions covering a diverse range of fields.

The call for papers has closed, but registrations remain open. A preliminary program is available here. For more information, see the website.

The Race, Whiteness and Indigeneity International Conference

National Indigenous Research and Knowledges Network

Dates: 6-8 June 2017

Location: Surfers Paradise, Queensland

This conference begins an interdisciplinary conversation focusing on race, whiteness and Indigeneity within the context of settler colonialisms in the USA, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Hawaii. It offers an opportunity to participate in increasingly voluble and global conversations about the denial and significance of race, whiteness and Indigeneity in the 21st century. The conference not only introduces new theoretical developments and knowledge, it also provides researchers and policy makers with an engaging forum in which to discuss the historical and contemporary links between race, Indigeneity and whiteness. Bringing together leading national and international scholars working in Critical Race Studies, Indigenous Studies and Whiteness Studies, the conference will initiate conversations about race, Indigeneity, whiteness and their mutually constitutive relationships. The conference will feature four plenary sessions related to future directions for teaching, research and policy plus concurrent sessions and roundtable discussions.

The call for individual papers and roundtables will close on 30 April. For more information, see the website.

Seminar: The Court of Disputed Returns

Australian Association of Constitutional Law

Date: 27 June 2017

Time: 5.30pm – 7.00pm

Location:  Federal Court of Australia, Sydney

This event is for members of the Australian Association of Constitutional Law (AACL).  If you are interested in becoming a member of AACL see this website.

At this seminar, a paper will be given by Craig Lenehan, Fifth Floor St James Hall.  The Hon Justice John Griffiths, Federal Court of Australia and Professor Anne Twomey, University of Sydney, will participate as commentators.

2017 ICON-S Annual Conference

‘Courts, Power and Public Law’

International Society of Public Law

Dates: 5-7 July 2017

Location: Copenhagen

The theme of the Conference will be ‘Courts, Power and Public Law’. The expanding role of courts is arguably one of the most significant developments in late-20th and early-21st century government. This theme provides the opportunity to examine a range of important questions connected with the modern rise in the importance of judicial power. The Conference will feature a keynote address as well as three plenary sessions featuring prominent jurists, intellectuals and decision-makers, and focusing on the general theme of Annual Meeting.

The call for papers has closed, but registrations remain open. A preliminary program is available here. For more information, see the website.

International Association of Genocide Scholars Conference 2017

‘Justice and the Prevention of Genocide’

TC Beirne School of Law and the Asia Pacific Centre for the Responsibility to Protect

Dates: 9–13 July 2017

Location: University of Queensland, Brisbane

Nearly seven decades after the United Nations General Assembly adopted the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, the hopes embedded in that document remain largely unfulfilled. The theme of the 2017 IAGS conference revisits the two core components of the Convention: justice for acts of genocide and prevention of future genocides.

The call for papers has closed, but registrations remain open. Early bird registrations are available until 14 April. For more information, see the website.

Australian Institute of Administrative Law National Conference

Australian Institute of Administrative Law

Dates: 20-21 July 2017

Location: Canberra

The theme of the Conference is Ripples of Affection – Administrative Law and Communities. The subtheme to be explored is ‘meeting community expectations – engagement and participation – achieving just and correct outcomes’. The call for papers is now closed.

For more information, see the website.

Castan Centre For Human Rights Law Conference 2017

Castan Centre for Human Rights, Monash University 

Date: Friday 21 July 2017
Time: 9.00am – 5.00pm
Location: The Edge, Federation Square, Corner Swanston and Flinders Street, Melbourne

Speakers already announced for the annual Human Rights Conference include Kevin Myles, Johnny Lawrence, Associate Professor Jan Breckenridge and Dr Kate Seear.  For more information, see the website.

Centre for Comparative Constitutional Law Conference 2017

Centre for Comparative Constitutional Law, Melbourne Law School

Date: 21 July 2017

Location: Melbourne Law School

The Conference will focus on themes of recent and continuing significance in constitutional law, including non-statutory executive power, proportionality in Australia following McCloy, retrospectivity and the rule of law. The final session of the conference will cover the landmark constitutional law decisions of the ‘French Court’. Speakers will include the Hon Kenneth Hayne AC QC, Justin Gleeson SC, Professor James Stellios, Professor Adrienne Stone, Professor Fiona Wheeler, Associate Professor Leighton McDonald, Associate Professor Kristen Rundle and Dr Brendan Lim.

Early bird registrations are available until 14 May. For more information, see the website.

Free lecture: Boundaries of Public Law

Melbourne Law School

Date: 26 July 2017

Time: 12:00-7:30pm

Location: Melbourne Law School

Now a well–established field of law and doctrinal inquiry, public law has nevertheless either lost its self-evident “autonomy” in the continental systems (as in France) or never acquired such a privileged status (UK, and possibly Australia), despite its development. Redefining the boundaries of public law now seems more necessary than ever. This may raise questions as to the status of the core concepts in the field, and a willingness to challenge the very nature of the “publicness” of public law. The lecture will be delivered by Professor Denis Baranger, a leading public law scholar at the Université PanthéonAssas.

For more information, see the website.

Accountability & the Law Conference 2017

The Australia Institute

Date: 17 August 2017

Location: Canberra

Weak accountability laws, low levels of public disclosure and the lack of a federal anti-corruption watchdog make many cases of undue influence and soft corruption at a federal level hidden from public view. With experts from across legal and academic fields, the Conference will discuss the weaknesses in the current federal accountability system and suggest mechanisms for reform. Speakers include Nicholas Cowdery AM QC, Shadow Attorney General Mark Dreyfus QC, Senator Nick Xenophon, George Williams AO, Bret Walker SC, Noel Hutley SC, Professor AJ Brown, Associate Professor Joo Cheong Tham and Associate Professor Gabrielle Appleby.

For more information, see the website.

Australian Political Studies Association Conference 2017

‘Democracy and Populism: A New Age of Extremes?’

Monash University

Dates: 25-27 September 2017

Location: Melbourne

The rise of populist movements has been a process defined by polarised debates and seemingly intractable confrontations that have challenged dominant understandings of both domestic and international order.  The fluidity and unpredictability of contemporary politics presents as much challenge as it does opportunity. As such, the Conference seeks to explore whether these tensions open new possibilities for discussion and transformation. It calls for papers that will critically investigate the landscape of these fluid tensions as well as interrogating the tools we use to grapple with this, from scholars of Political Science, International Relations, Political Theory and Philosophy, Comparative Politics, Public Policy, and other related fields.

Instructions for submitting papers and panel proposals, including details of the conference website and contact emails, will be released shortly.

Save the Date: Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law Annual Conference 2017

‘The Global Compacts on Refugees and Migrants’

Kaldor Centre for International Refugee Law

Dates: 24 November 2017

Location: University of New South Wales, Sydney

In 2018, world leaders will adopt two landmark documents – a Global Compact on Refugees, and a Global Compact on Safe, Regular and Orderly Migration. Amidst debate about what these agreements should contain and how ambitious they should be, the 2017 Kaldor Centre Conference takes stock of where we are so far, and anticipates what developments we will see in the lead-up to their adoption in 2018. The Conference will bring together leading international and local experts involved in the process to share their insights and projections. The keynote speaker will be Professor Elizabeth Ferris, a leading expert on forced migration at Georgetown University and the Brookings Institution.

For more information, see the website.

The Law, Literature & Humanities Association of Australasia Annual Conference 2017

‘Dissents and Dispositions’

The Law, Literature & Humanities Association of Australasia

Dates: 12-14 December 2017

Location: La Trobe Law School and Melbourne Law School

The Conference invites explorations of the dispositions of law and jurisprudence, and how these relate to dissents, resistance and transformation. We call for re-examinations of the dispositions of critique, and the conduct of dissent. Researchers and others working in any area of law or the humanities, broadly conceived, are called to share your own engagements with dissents and dispositions. As with previous conferences, we especially welcome scholarship into relationships with indigenous jurisprudences and the humanities, Asian and Australian humanities and jurisprudences and the regional elaboration of the South.

For more information, see the website.

Save the Date: IACL World Congress 2018

‘Violent Conflicts, Peace-Building and Constitutional Law’

Dates: 18-22 June 2018

Location: Seoul

This will be the tenth World Congress of the International Association of Constitutional Law (‘IACL’). The theme of the World Congress is ‘Violent Conflicts, Peace-Building and Constitutional Law’. The World Congress will be hosted and co-organised by the Korean Association of the IACL in collaboration with the Executive Committee of the IACL.

For more information, see the website.

World Congress of Political Science

‘Borders and Margins’

Dates: 21-26 July 2018

Location: Brisbane

The post-Cold War acceleration of globalization and the multi-layered consequences of the 9/11 terrorist attacks have had profound effects on borders. These borders create margins, through which administrative and military bureaucracies, NGOs, activists, and more-or-less organized criminals and terrorists operate, empirically and conceptually. The evolution of information technologies has transformed the traditional “border as a barrier” by enclosing people into groups with common identities and interests, dispersed throughout the globe but virtually connected.

The call for submissions opens in May 2017 and closes in October 2017. For more information, see the website.